Michael Förster

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Michael Förster
Michael Förster is a senior policy analyst at the OECD Social Policy Division. He has been working in different departments at the OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs since 1986 and, particularly, has been involved in successive OECD work on income distribution and poverty. He is co-author of "Growing Unequal?" (OECD 2008) and lead author of the follow-up study, "Divided we Stand: Why Inequality keeps rising" (OECD 2011). Mr. Förster is currently directing several follow-up projects to this work, including work on the impact of the Great Recession and consolidation policies on inequalities in OECD countries, a study on the distributive effects of employment structure changes, and work on recent poverty and inequality trends in OECD and emerging economies. In the past, he has been working with international research institutes, such as the Luxembourg Income Study (1994-1996) and the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Vienna (2000-2004). Mr. Förster studied economics at the Universities of Vienna, Austria (M.A.) and Saarbrücken, Germany and holds a Ph.D. from University of Liege, Belgium. He is member of several scientific advisory boards of international research projects and the NGO "inequality watch", and a member of the French national observatory of poverty and social exclusion (ONPES). He is author of various journal articles, research papers and book contributions.

Selected publications

"Cross-country evidence of the multiple causes of inequality in the OECD area" (with I. Tóth), in: Handbook of Income Distribution (eds. F. Bourguignon and A.B. Atkinson), 2014 (forthcoming).

"Trends in Top Incomes and their Taxation in OECD Countries" (with A. Llena-Nozal and V. Nafilyan, OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers No. 159, OECD Publishing, Paris 2014.

"Demographic or labour market trends: What determines the distribution of household earnings in OECD countries?" (with W.H. Chen and A. Llena-Nozal), in: OECD Journal: Economic Studies, Volume 2013.

"Money or Kindergarten? Distributive Effects of Cash versus In-Kind Family Transfers for Young Children" (with G. Verbist), OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, No. 135, OECD Publishing, Paris 2012.

Divided we Stand: Why Inequality keeps rising (with an authors’ team), OECD Publishing, Paris 2011.

Tackling Inequality in Brazil, China, India and South Africa: the Role of Labour Market and Social Policies (ed., with E. Arnal), OECD Publishing, Paris 2010.

"How much redistribution do Welfare States achieve? The role of cash transfers and household taxes" (with P. Whiteford), CESifo DICE Report – Journal for Institutional Comparisons, Vol. 7/3, pp. 34-41. Munich, 2009.

Growing Unequal? Income Distribution and Poverty in OECD Countries (with M. Mira d’Ercole and an authors’ team), Paris, OECD, 2008.

Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers. Three volumes covering 11 OECD countries. (with P. Andersson, A. Llena-Nozal and C. Prinz), OECD Publishing, Paris, 2006, 2007 and 2008.

"The European Social Space Revisited: Comparing Poverty in the Enlarged European Union", in: Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Vol. 7, n° 1, pp. 29-48, Routledge Journals, 2005.

"Regional Poverty and Income Inequality in Central and Eastern Europe" (with D. Jesuit and T. Smeeding), in: R. Kanbur and A.J. Venables (eds.), Spatial Inequality and Development, pp. 311-347. OUP.

"Income Distribution and Poverty in the OECD Area: Trends and Driving Forces" (with M. Pearson). OECD Economic Studies, No.34, pp. 7-39. Paris 2002.

"Child Poverty and Family Cash Transfers in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland" (with I. Tóth). In: Journal of European Social Policy 11.4, pp. 324-341. London, 2001.


Contact:
Michael F. Förster
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs – Social Policy Division
2, Rue André Pascal 75775 Paris Cedex 16
Tel (33 1) 45 24 92 80
michael.forster@oecd.org
http://www.oecd.org/social/inequality-and-poverty.htm